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Archive for the ‘press releases’ Category

KIEM is Channel 3 in Eureka area.

Here’s a link to the February 8, 2013  6:00pm story on the Fair Wage Act  http://kiem-tv.com/node/4758 

Take the poll about the Eureka Fair Wage Act!  http://kiem-tv.com/node/4756 .

If it just shows you results then it has already counted your vote.

 Thank you!  Tell all your friends to vote!
A People’s Initiative for a
$12.00 An Hour Minimum Wage for Large Employers

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Law Center’s Advocacy Creates International Pressure

February 06, 2012:  In an unprecedented letter to Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, the United Nations has delivered a clear message: by not providing sanitation and safe drinking water, the city is violating the human rights of homeless persons.

The letter, sent by UN Special Rapporteur Catarina de Albuquerque, cites targeted closings of public restrooms, decommissioning of water fountains, and a lack of other clean water sources as blatant violations.

Albuquerque visited Sacramento in February 2011, as part of a fact-finding mission organized by the Law Center and Sacramento-based Safe Ground and Legal Services of Northern California.  She heard direct testimony from homeless campers, who are forced to rely on makeshift privy systems to deal with privacy and human waste issues.

“The UN has delivered a powerful message: the U.S. doesn’t get a free pass on its human rights violations.  Sacramento must take immediate steps to address the needs of its homeless population, ” said Eric Tars, human rights program director at the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty (the Law Center).  “Access to water and sanitary facilities is one of the most fundamental of human rights — essential to everyone’s health, dignity, and continued life. ”

To read the full press release, click here.

To read the full letter to Mayor Johnson, click here.

To read the UN’s report, click here.

http://www.nlchp.org/news.cfm?id=178

The organization has a newsletter, free, online subscription.
National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty
www.nlchp.org  and WDC ph.  202-638-2535

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   SEPTEMBER 26, 2011

Eureka Officers Viciously Beat Martin and Left Him to Die in Jail Cell

Eureka, CA: A jury delivered a resounding victory for plaintiffs in a police misconduct civil rights case by awarding the total sum of $4,575,000 against the City of Eureka and Eureka police officers Adam Laird, Justin Winkle, and Gary Whitmer for the death of Martin Cotton II. Punitive damages were assessed against the three officers. Mr. Cotton, a 26 year-old man living on the streets died of blunt force head trauma. The plaintiffs, represented by attorneys Dale K. Galipo and Vicki I. Sarmiento of Los Angeles County, were Mr. Cotton’s 5 year-old daughter and his father. The jury found that Officers Laird and Winkle used excessive force, and that all three officers failed to provide medical care.

 

On August 9th, 2007, Eureka police officers Winkle, Laird, Whitmer, and five others were involved in beating an unarmed Martin Cotton II to death. In broad daylight, officers pummeled Mr. Cotton’s head and body then brought Mr. Cotton to jail, failing to seek medical assistance for him. Expert testimony presented by the plaintiffs established that timely medical care would have saved Mr. Cotton’s life. Mr. Cotton died in the jail cell within two hours.

 

Painful video of Mr. Cotton dying in jail was presented during the trial.

 

The fatal beating of Mr. Cotton occurred outside the Eureka Rescue Mission. Police were dispatched to the Mission for a disturbance involving Mr. Cotton. When they arrived, Mr. Cotton was no longer in the Mission and was alone and defenseless. Laird and Winkle claim they ordered him to put his hands behind his back and he did not move. Both officers pepper sprayed him, Officer Winkle kneed him in the ribs and forced him to the ground where the officers beat him. Mr. Cotton made no moves against the police and remained prone on the concrete. Officer Whitmer (the third officer on the scene) gave a running kick to Mr. Cotton, battered him with a baton, and pepper-sprayed him. More officers arrived and joined in the beating. The trial of Siehna Cotton et al v. City of Eureka included police readily admitting they they sat on Mr. Cotton, forced his head onto the concrete throughout the beating, kicked him, hit him with a metal baton, kneed at his vulnerable organs, deployed pepper spray three times, and did not seek medical assistance for him afterward. The officers, however, denied hitting Mr. Cotton in the head, most likely because blunt force head trauma was determined as the cause of death.  Crucial testimony came from two civilian witnesses who bravely reported that they had indeed seen at least Officer Winkle pounding on Mr. Cotton’s skull multiple times on the concrete. One witness said he heard “fist-to-skull”, “bone-on-bone” from those head strikes.

 

The verdict was announced September 23, 2011 after a two week trial and 7 hours of jury deliberation in Federal Court in Oakland. Siehna Cotton was awarded $1,250,000 for the pain her father suffered and $2,750,000 for wrongful death damages. Marty Cotton Sr. was awarded $500,000, which required plaintiffs to show that the officers’ actions “shocked the conscience.” The jury also found that the officers acted with “malice, oppression, or reckless disregard” to the decedent’s or plaintiffs’ rights, and assessed punitive damages, $30,000 from officer Winkle, $30,000 from officer Laird, and $15,000 from officer Whitmer.

 

Mr. Cotton was one of many people killed by police in the Humboldt region from fall 2005 to fall 2007. 

 

Attorney Vicki Sarmiento hopes the verdict sends shockwaves to other officers who may consider committing such atrocities in the future. “We don’t want this to happen to anyone else. We as a community, we as a society, cannot tolerate it.” Ms. Sarmiento speaks of the victory, “The jury’s decision showed respect for Martin Cotton’s life. They acknowledge the wrong that occurred and acknowledge that Martin’s life had value. The issue of human dignity and humanity is what this is about, and that everyone has a right to have that.”

###

 

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Martin Cotton Family Awarded Over $4.5 Million in Trial Against Eureka Police (VIDEO included)

This link will also bring you to the video-taped interview from after the verdict.  Video is also below.
http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2011/09/23/18691150.php

Greetings,

The resounding jury decision could not have happened without the years of dedication by Redwood Curtain CopWatch; the courage, strength, and graciousness of Marty Cotton Sr.; the critical solidarity and organizing of the Oscar Grant Committee; the generosity of a few righteous Oakland attorneys; the networking and sharing of resources by Berkeley CopWatch; the bravery of the civilian witnesses to tell the truth; and the sharp, brilliant, hard work from the Cottons’ attorneys, Vicki I. Sarmiento and Dale K. Galipo.

Solidarity from people in and near Oakland throughout the trial – some being folks in the IWW, the Transport Workers Solidarity Committee, the SDS and MDS – has been so important.

Having read yesterday’s article from the Eureka Times-Standard, I want to make something clear.  Contrary to how the local Humboldt mainstream media would like to misconstrue reality, the Eureka cops, through their brutal punches and slamming of Martin’s head on the concrete, then throwing him in a cell without medical help, killed Martin.  The cops caused his painful death and used their hands to do it. And the jury got a grave understanding of that, and decided on a “wrongful death” verdict.

This federal jury decision in the Cotton case is a victory and gift for the people. I hope that people who live outside, live on the streets in and around Eureka can breathe easier; feel proud for the marching, protesting and speaking out about Martin’s death; and also feel some vindication because the brazen intimidation and violence that the cops inflict on people living on the streets has been officially recognized.  

Thank You, Martin “Fred” Cotton. 

We will continue to work together for DIGNITY for all lives.

Long Live Martin Cotton!  Long Live Troy Davis! 
Long Live the Strength of the People and Power of the Truth! ~Verbena

Below is a great summary.

Martin Cotton Family Awarded Over $4.5 Million in Trial Against Eureka Police, Interview: Video

by dave id  Friday Sep 23rd, 2011

On August 9th, 2007, Eureka police officers Justin Winkle, Gary Whitmer, Adam Laird, and five others were involved in beating an unarmed Martin Cotton II to death. Eureka police pummeled Martin Cotton’s body and head in broad daylight, using pepper spray repeatedly. Martin Cotton was then sent to jail without being offered medical treatment. He died in jail within about an hour. A federal civil rights lawsuit in Oakland was filed to seek justice for Martin on behalf of his young daughter. The case, Siehna Cotton et al v. City of Eureka, included the testimony of police readily admitting they beat Martin Cotton all over his body and did not seek medical assistance for him afterward. The police however denied that they hit Martin Cotton in the head, most likely because blows to the head were determined to be the cause of death.

 

At about 1pm on September 23rd, the verdict was announced for the two-week trial. A seven-person jury found unanimously in favor of the plaintiffs, big time. Siehna Cotton was awarded $1,250,000 for the pain Martin Cotton suffered at the hands of Eureka police and $2,750,000 for wrongful death damages. Additionally, Marty Cotton Sr. was awarded $500,000, which required plaintiffs to meet the highest burden of proof in a civil trial, that is that the murder of Martin Cotton “shocked the conscience.” A rare award of punitive damages against the three officers required a finding of “malice, oppression, or reckless disregard” to the decedent’s or plaintiffs’ rights, for which the jury assessed $30,000 from officer Winkle, $30,000 from officer Laird, and $15,000 from officer Whitmer, who arrived at the scene late but joined in on the beating.

 

Crucial to the verdict was the testimony of two witnesses who bravely reported that they had indeed seen at least officer Winkle striking Martin Cotton’s skull. Painful video of Martin Cotton dying in jail was presented during the trial which obviously effected jurors, four of whom wore black in solidarity with the family today as the verdict was read.

 

In the video below, Cotton family attorney Vicki Sarmiento and Verbena Lea of Redwood Curtain CopWatch speak about the verdict re-establishing Martin Cotton’s humanity and the shockwaves they hope the decision will send through the ranks of police who may consider committing such atrocities in the future.

martincotton_verdict-interview_092311.jpg

[Pictured above: Verbena Lea of Redwood Curtain CopWatch and Cotton family attorney Vicki Sarmiento]

Quote from MDS, SDS, and Oscar Grant Committee:
“This victory uplifts our spirits and gives us strength to step up the struggle against police violence, brutality, murder and other forms of state repression that occur on a regular basis. One victory , many battles
still to be fought”

 

http://www.indybay.org/js/flowplayer/FlowPlayer.swf

Video-Taped Interview from after the Verdict

Also, the below links are to video from the Sept. 21st press conference held in front of the Federal Building in Oakland:

http://www.redwoodcurtaincopwatch.net/node/907.

or

http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2011/09/22/18691008.php

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TRIAL BEGAN SEPTEMBER 12, 2011 at 8:30am

[RALLY at 7:30am on 12th, first day of trial]

Trial Wed (9/14), Thurs (9/15), Friday (9/16), Wed (9/21)  
8:30am- 2:30pm  
Must have U.S. ID or Passport to go in

READ UPDATES:  1  2  3

Please join Redwood Curtain CopWatch in attending the trial.  We are organizing with groups in the Bay Area also.  If you are interested in going to Oakland for any part of the trial, please get in contact: copwatchrwc@riseup.net   707.633.4493
More on Martin’s death here.

TO DOWNLOAD ABOVE FLIER: http://redwoodcurtaincopwatch.net/files/Flier_CottonTrial.jpg

 

*JURY TRIAL in FEDERAL COURT in OAKLAND*

begins Monday, Sept 12th 8:30am
1301 Clay St. 4
th floor, Courtroom #1
Oakland, CA
U.S. District Court- Northern District

                 

PLEASE JOIN SEPT 12 RALLY OUTSIDE COURT 7:30AM


Be PRESENT at the trial:
Mon 9/12 Wed 9/14 Thurs 9/15 Fri 9/16 Wed 9/21


Dignity for ALL… Justice for Martin Cotton!

UPDATES:  

http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2011/09/15/18690439.php

http://www.redwoodcurtaincopwatch.net/node/900

Redwood Curtain CopWatch: 707.633.4493  copwatchrwc@riseup.net
Oscar Grant Committee: 510.655.5764


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href=”https://peopleproject.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/rally_people_tank_new.jpg”>

Richardson Grove Action Now invites all to a rally on Monday, February 21st, to stop the highway expansion through Richardson Grove State Park.

Expose CalTrans’ lies and misinformation campaign!

Monday’s rally will begin at NOON in the Garberville Town Square.

Bring anything you want to express yourself!

Resist Invasion!

For more info contact Richardson Grove Action Now, call
(707) 602-7551 or email rgroveactionnow@gmail.com.

Fliers and Handbills will be available Friday Feb 18, 2011!

Richardson Grove Action Now literature exposing CalTrans LIES and misinformation coming soon!

Richardson Grove Action Now pamphlet: http://www.box.net/shared/6xyyml02vu

<a

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Mass RALLY at CalTrans in Eureka

NO Highway Expansion THROUGH RICHARDSON GROVE!

Protect the forest and our future.  Resist Invasion.

 

Monday, Feb 7th  NOON

 

CalTrans District 1 Headquarters

1656 Union St. (Union and Wabash)

Eureka

 

Bring anything you want to express yourself!

For info or to get more involved contact Richardson Grove Action Now:  (707) 602-7551,  rgroveactionnow@gmail.com

READ the pamphlet from Richardson Grove Action Now: http://www.box.net/shared/6xyyml02vu

 

Here are links to Fliers to download and post:

Flier with tank

Flier with forest root web

***

Sunday Feb 6th, the day before the rally…

If you’re in Southern Humboldt, go to the Garberville Town Square at noon for Bob Marley’s birthday celebration and a craft-making event in preparation for Monday’s mass rally at Cal Trans District 1 Headquarters. Organize rideshares and rally spectacles!

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Posted on Thu, Nov. 18, 2010 By DANA DiFILIPPO Philadelphia Daily News difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934

THE FORECLOSURE notices have piled up, and collection agents call weekly.

http://www.philly.com/dailynews/multimedia/BC679067330001.html
Esther “Moya” Smith fears it won’t be long before the bank changes the locks and boots her from the redbrick rowhouse in Olney where her mother moved the brood 15 years ago.

But she won’t go. She can’t go, she says.

At 31, she’s the reluctant head of her household since her mother died two years ago, leaving her in charge of her two teenage sisters and baby nephew. Financial troubles that started with her mother’s medical and funeral bills mounted until she fell seven months behind on mortgage payments, prompting foreclosure.

So, today, Smith, her neighbors and community activists will gather at her house on Widener Street near 3rd. They plan to stay there – camping out “for however long it takes” – to fight the foreclosure and ensure that Smith’s family keeps the house.

“We are willing to go to jail. This family will not go out on the [Roosevelt] Boulevard for the holidays,” said Cheri Honkala, of the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign. “We shouldn’t allow banks to come into neighborhoods and empty buildings and create crackhouses. In this economy, they should be forced to modify [mortgages]. If they board the house up, we will take the boards off and move everybody back in.”

In Philadelphia, a city with 40,000 vacant or abandoned properties, squatters are as plentiful as Wawas and water ice.

But many of today’s squatters aren’t the wretches and drug-addled runaways of the imagination: They’re poor families, like Esther Smith and her charges, so desperate to stay together that they’ll move into a blighted property – or squat in their own foreclosed home.

No one tracks the number of squatters. But homeless and anti-poverty advocates say that the unrelenting recession has kept homeless shelters full daily, forcing those without homes to bunk with family or friends, or to squat in abandoned buildings.

“It’s the reality show that no one sees,” Honkala said.

Homelessness in Philadelphia has risen sharply since 2000, when there were 1,175 homeless people in the city, according to Project HOME, a homeless-advocacy group that keeps a census for the city of people living in shelters and on the streets. This year, that population has grown to 1,720, Project HOME found.

“More people are losing their homes and their jobs, and we’re absolutely seeing more families double up with [other] family members,” said Marsha Cohen, executive director of the Homeless Advocacy Project.

Laura I. Weinbaum, Project HOME’s director of public policy, added, “Anecdotally, we are seeing more people in squatting situations.”

Smith never thought that she’d become a squatter in her own home.

Two years ago, she worked an overnight shift as a campus shuttle-bus driver at the University of Pennsylvania.

In August 2008, her mother died. Smith’s youngest sister, Monica, then 10, quickly devolved into grief-fueled insomnia and misbehavior at school. After missing work several times to help her sister, Smith got fired, she said.

“I felt hurt, because I needed the income, but I needed even more to be at home for her,” Smith said.

Smith cobbled together an income doing odd jobs in home construction, car repair and baby-sitting – anything that allowed her to focus on her sister first.

But with an inconsistent income, she soon fell behind the seven months on her $645 monthly mortgage bills.

In early summer, she applied to her mortgage company, Texas-based American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc., for a loan modification. They denied her application, saying that her debt-to-income ratio was too high, meaning that she made too little money to qualify for a modification.

She also applied to several foreclosure-assistance programs run by social-service agencies, but she was told they had run out of money.

In July, she said, she started collecting $316 a month in welfare.

In August, her sister Barbara – who was living with her husband, an Army soldier stationed in Texas who will deploy to Iraq in January, and their 2-year-old son, Jovanie – moved back in with Smith to help with the bills. Smith and her sister thought that Barbara’s income as a housekeeper at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, along with $200 monthly from her husband’s soldier’s pay, might be enough to fend off foreclosure.

But last month, Smith received her first foreclosure notice.

Since then, she’s gotten calls several times a week from the company, demanding payment.

The increased pressure to pay prompted Honkala’s group to champion her case.

“[Leaving the home] is not an option,” Honkala said last week. “There’s a growing army around her.”

Honkala has plenty of experience in standoffs and sit-ins.

As founder of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union, she set up tent cities for homeless people on vacant lots and led marches to raise awareness about poverty and homelessness in the early 2000s. She disappeared for a few years to help her sister and others fight foreclosure in Minnesota and to raise her son, Guillermo, now 8.

But she’s back in Philadelphia and ready for battle, with her new group, the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign.

The group teaches “foreclosure classes” and encourages squatting, or “homesteading” as Honkala prefers to call it, to people like Smith. Lessons include topics such as how to participate in nonviolent civil disobedience, how to prove residency in order to get utilities – even when possession of a home is illegal – and how to explain to children what’s happening.

“They can call us a criminal all they want,” Honkala said, “but we think we’ll be upholding higher laws: laws of humanity. We are good mothers and sisters and caregivers who are going to care for our families however we have to.”

In Smith’s case, it’s too early to tell whether today’s planned sit-in will be more consciousness-raising or civil disobedience.

Philippa Brown, a spokeswoman for Smith’s lienholder, American Mortgage, said her company is considering modifying Smith’s $60,000 mortgage, but she wouldn’t release details. The foreclosure, which is temporarily on hold until the company decides whether to alter the loan, will move forward unless Smith clears her outstanding debt, Brown said.

Smith is delinquent by about $9,000 since April; about half is mortgage payments, while the other is penalties and fees, Smith said.

Now that her little sister Monica has improved, Smith said she has applied for numerous jobs, including retail and janitorial positions, as well as jobs with SEPTA, the Philadelphia Police Department and the Philadelphia Prisons System. But she’s had no luck landing anything.

One morning last week, sassy, saggy-diapered Jovanie frolicked in the family’s living room, where they still keep candles lighted and glasses full of water for their mother.

“They give evolution to the spirit,” Smith said.

As December approaches, Smith said she grows more depressed. Barbara, Monica and Jovanie all have December birthdays. A foreclosure and eviction, Smith noted sourly, would be lousy birthday gifts.

“The sad thing is with most of these struggles [to stave off homelessness], we’ve lost them,” Honkala said. “This time, hopefully, there will be an angel.”

Smith, sifting through old photos of her mother, smiled and agreed: “Yes. Hopefully.”

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For Immediate Release: contact Paul 707.923.4488
Oct 27, 2010.

Emerald Region Poor People’s Campaign

STAND UP GET UP

Once again, the rain is a sign for police action against the poor. Wed, Oct 27, camps have been raided here in SoHum. Shamefully, deputies and chp have set up checkpoints in Redway and street sweeps in Garberville as well. Those without I.D.s showing local addresses are warned to leave the area or face arrest.

Numbers of people were arrested and others issued tickets. Reportedly the police are promising 20 or more officers for Thursday, Oct. 28.

Opposed to a police state for the poor who don’t have the proper papers? Fed up with a County where the police and some hardline merchants and some hippy gentry make policy and NOT elected officials and their administrators?

This a Civil Rights issue. Poor people are the objects of an organized campaign where “homeless” is a shorthand to hate speech. As we are told repeatedly, most Americans are two paychecks (or one mortgage or rental agreement) away from, this locally criminalized “homelessness”. This an unabashed war on the poor, starting at the bottom.

The choice is obvious – to identify clearly with the Civil Rights of poor people and stand in support.

For that purpose, there will be a Poor People Solidarity Rally in downtown Garberville at noon on this Thursday, Oct 28 and again at noon on Friday.

Bring a sign, a song, a statement – in the spirit of Martin Luther King and Bob Marley. Stand up, get up, stand up for our rights.

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