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Days Of Action Against Police Brutality, Oct 22-23 2013 EUREKA

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Below is a reportback from Skye, a participant this year.  Verbena, of Redwood Curtain CopWatch, wrote the following 3 paragraphs only to fill in what Skye was not present for.

Sending love & comfort & solidarity to young Andy Lopez‘ spirit and his family & community.  13 year old Andy was killed by Santa Rosa deputies on Oct 22.Image

from Verbena
On the night of Oct 22, 2013, while some protestors slept at Cesar Chavez park, a couple of us went, from midnight to 3am, to the Humboldt County Jail for “Welcome Out”!  ImageWe sat in a car right near where people exit the jail, with a bin of warm socks and clothes, tobacco, and a sign on the windshield to welcome people out on the cold, blustery night.  It is such a worthwhile and necessary activity; should be a regular thing. We encountered about 7 people who needed something warm, the use of a phone, maybe a cigarette, a friendly face and listening ears.

The next morning, October 23rd, people gathered for breakfast at Clarke Plaza, open to everyone who was hungry or wanting coffee or tea.  One of Chris Burgess’ brother’s came by; this being the 7th anniversary of his brother’s death.  Even those of us who never met Christopher during his short life, will always remember him.

After some music, some tears, and gathering up our signs, we marched and biked to Eureka Police Department where murder and cruelty are common practice.  And where violent creeps, like Terence Liles, Rodrigo Reyna-Sanchez, Murl Harpham, and Justin Winkle, reside.  We are not afraid to call that out. Then we moved on (happily) to the neighborhoods of Eureka, where we talked with folks, and people remember Christopher and show spirited agreement- from their cars, houses, and yards- with the messages in our chants and banners: STOP POLICE BRUTALITY, LILES IS A KILLER, BEING A YOUTH IS NOT A CRIME, R.I.P. ZACHARY COOK (DEC 23 1989-JAN 4 2007) KILLED BY EPD’S LILES, CHANGE IS POSSIBLE,  WE REMEMBER CHRIS BURGESS. With dignity and strength, and care for each other, we decry and defy the intimidation of the police state.  ~Verbena

from Skye 10-25-13
For the past eighteen years, cities across the United States have rallied on October 22nd to show solidarity against police brutality. I am learning that occurrences of police brutality are much more numerous and severe in the United States than they are back home in Canada. A sad truth that is only deepened through the discovery that such violence often leads to death. This sharp reality felt all too often in the communities of the most northern part of California where police brutality ranges from daily intimidation to outright murder, tasering to decades of confined isolation.

Typically a one day event, the March is extended to two days in Eureka to honour the memory of Christopher Burgess, a 16 year old who was shot by a Eureka police officer on October 23rd, 2006. The supporters met at noon on the 22nd to share in discussion, food, and sign making. Despite the cloudy skies and serious purpose, spirits were high with the anticipation to flex our vocal cords and work our legs during the march. The call went out to begin and we each picked up a sign and gathered outside the park on the street.

Marching along an unplanned route, the group walked past the high school as the students were being released for the day. ImageMany showed their support to the idea of removing police from schools. An understandable reaction from students who are finding their schools resembling prisons more and more – security check points, undercover police, random locker searches, metal detectors. I hope we realize soon that treating people like criminals does not help in any way, especially when they are not. After a quick break the group continued to march through the city, waving signs, yelling chants, and throwing up peace signs to passing traffic.

Much to the group’s gratitude, the police encounters passed by without incident. Many people showed their support for our protest with honks from their vehicles as they drove by. The drivers who found themselves in a hurry were not too pleased with our presence on the street, even though we always left room for them to pass around. An understandable reaction to the injustice of having one’s life run by a clock – we wished them free time in response to their show of frustration. As the time to march came to a close, we stopped at another park to set up for the evening’s events.

An abundant feast was gifted to the sore footed group to nourish their bodies and hearts after the day’s walk. And while we ate, entertainment of the highest calibre was shared for our pure enjoyment. As night fell the community came a little closer together through the sharing of gifts and the exciting of our taste buds and ear drums. The live music provided reflection and introspection, as well as laughter and participation. Deeper connections were made as we were given space to share stories, jokes, and hugs. Through the coming together over a common surface problem, we are given practice to dive deeper into a shared community experience.Image

 After dark fell, a humid, foggy candlelight vigil took the remaining group back to the day’s starting point for an overnight park camp out. This is where my path diverged – to return the next day in the late afternoon with one of my gifts – fresh cucumber mango guacamole and baked yam fries. Posted on a busy street corner with signs and free food for whomever was hungry, the group honored the fallen victims by sharing their stories with passerby’s. Another year to gather and remember those whose lives continue to be afflicted by the brutality of violence from those we give our trust to be protectors.

I am grateful for the opportunity to show support to a community bringing awareness to an important shadow of our culture – the disconnection that allows one person to take another’s life and to perpetuate violence of the most disgraceful sort. The pervasive and obvious favoritism, elitism, and corruption infecting the enforcement agencies of this area have left me stunned and humbled. I honor and acknowledge the challenges faced by a population of people who are dealing with such a horrible treatment on a regular basis. No being deserves oppression at any level – be it physical, psychological, or spiritual. To commit such acts of violence require a disconnection from one’s heart so vast that the whisper of consciousness seems to have disappeared entirely.

Somewhere inside, buried deeper in some, the spark of light resides and awaits its chance to be heard and felt. This light exists in all of us. A hell inside creates the horrors of our lives. The love inside creates heaven on Earth. In this dawning age of truth, justice, and integrity we are each asked to step into our highest expression and to take responsibility for the actions we take and words we speak. Are you looking at a badge, uniform, or costume – or are you looking into someone’s eyes and seeing them standing there – as scared as you are – as full of beautiful creative potential as you are? The resolution and healing processes being born through the new consciousness of humanity will seek not the false, demeaning, and inadequate deterrence and ‘punishment’ oriented solutions, but ones focusing on root causes, emotional healing, and collective community restoration. Sickness and health in a community is shared by all.

photos from Rogue Planet News and radmul.blogspot.com

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Spread the word!  February 14th Action!!!

The Feds are seriously looking to cut $100 Billion from the already limited housing-related programs!  Close to one million Section 8, public housing, homeless, elderly, and disabled people could lose their housing!

In solidarity with actions taking place in 25 other cities throughout the U.S., Rally and March in San Francisco this Valentine’s Day!

Monday, Feb 14th is the NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION TO SAVE CRITICAL HUD PROGRAMS led by the National Alliance of HUD Tenants

Join us in stopping the budget cuts to Housing Vouchers, Section 8 PBRA (Project Based Rental Assistance), Homeless Assistance Grants, and other housing related budget items!

!Unase con nosotros para ponerle un alto a los recortes del presupuesto a los Vales de Vivienda, Seccion 8 PBRA, Subvencion de asistencia para personas sin hogar, y otros articulos relacionados al presupuesto de Vivienda!

Monday February 14th

@ 2pm

Rally at San Francisco Civic Center

March to the Federal Building!

 

Lunes 14 de Febrero

a las 2pm

Donde: Centro Civico de San Francisco

iVamos a marchar al Edificio Federal!

Here is a link to the facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=198056183539430

For FLIERS to this action: http://wraphome.org/pages/downloads/Valentine%27s%20Day%20Flyer.pdf

For a FACT SHEET on the housing cuts: http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3341

Groups involved in organizing this day of action in San Francisco:

WRAP (Western Regional Advocacy Project), SF Coalition on Homelessness, SF Housing Rights Committee, Causa Justa: Just Cause, Building Opportunities for Self-Sufficiency (BOSS), Homes Not Jails, AIDS Housing Alliance/SF, Council of Community Housing Organizations, and many other housing rights groups.

Please get the word out!

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The 3 PM rally in support of the right to sleep movement was well attended.
At least 100 people showed up and mingled and conversed in the plaza. (the consensus is that for every one that shows, ten more are quietly in support behind the scenes)

City Council member Eric Navickas obtained a permit for the rally. At 3:45pm the demonstrators marched down main street with many signs and a banner reading, “JUSTICE”. The course of the march led to the public library, then down Lithia Way and back to the Plaza. There were songs, chants, and
general support from the community as the march maintained footing in a single lane on the roads. The mood was joyous and hopeful, yet clear demands of recognition for the right to legally sleep were continually audible. The effect on the participants was an uplifting feeling of empowerment. Most felt that the rally was better than anticipated in overall effectiveness.

The homeless have continued to be harassed by the police since protests began last week in response to violations by the local police of their right to sleep.

Thursday’s private meeting between the mayor, police chief, city housing specialist, and community advocate Aaron Reed took place. The word from the mayor after the meeting is that there will be no policy change in how the police deal with houseless sleeping people. The police have indicated that they will cite and arrest houseless people at every chance that avails them.

When a critical mass of houseless folk and advocates is reached, positive political change will ensue. Look forward to more actions aimed at commanding the free expression and respect of basic human rights.

Join the re-evolution. Remember, we can overthrow the government by non-violent direct action.
Try reading Gandhi’s Autobiography for more insight into the workings of sustaining a viable political movement.
What kind of world do you envision?

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By Christopher Cadelago

Monday, November 8, 2010

The interfaith vigil from the San Diego Rescue Mission to the San Diego County Administration Center was designed to raise awareness of the men, women and children whose lives didn’t have to end on the streets.

Peggy Peattie

The interfaith vigil from the San Diego Rescue Mission to the San Diego County Administration Center was designed to raise awareness of the men, women and children whose lives didn’t have to end on the streets.

DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO — Nearly 300 people marched Sunday in a candlelight vigil to remember the homeless who have died on the streets of San Diego the past year.

Fifty of the marchers carried pairs of shoes meant to represent each of the homeless who died from Oct. 1, 2009 to Sept. 30. Participants stopped to pray on their way from the San Diego Rescue Mission to the San Diego County Administration Center.

More than 8,500 people in San Diego County were homeless at the beginning of this year, according to the Regional Task Force on the Homeless. That represented a roughly 8 percent increase from the 2009 count of 7,892, said Herb Johnson, president and chief executive of the Rescue Mission.

The interfaith event was designed to raise awareness of the men, women and children whose lives didn’t have to end on the streets. That so many homeless died last year in America’s Finest City “is absolutely unforgivable,” said Johnson.

He then turned his attention to the many homeless people who had gathered along Harbor Drive.

“There’s the shared meaning and understanding that could have been them,” he said. “These efforts give a voice to those who are not heard and those who will never be heard from again.”

The common refrain is that people choose to be homeless because they are unmotivated to work. But many of those living in shelters are employed and can’t afford housing. Others might suffer from mental illnesses, substance abuse or medical issues, said Bob McElroy of the Alpha Project.

Kami Peterson, 45, lost her three-bedroom El Cajon town home before sliding deeper into addiction. Peterson’s drug of choice was meth, she said, but it could have been any number of vices that brought down many of her peers now living at the Rescue Mission.

After leaving treatment last month she was reunited with her 6-year-old daughter, Angel. Each of Peterson’s six children, three of them under the age of 18, has served as motivation for her recovery. “It’s about learning or relearning responsibilities.”

Through she didn’t know Nancy Vega-Wright, 54, who died on the streets, it was impossible not to feel a connection while carrying shoes bearing her name, Peterson said.

The same went for Joseph Christie. The 53-year-old entered the Rescue Mission program after his Bonita home burned down in March. Since, he’s embraced religion, offering a series of prayers as he carried shoes meant to represent the death of 44-year-old Kevin Kline.

“Everyone has their own reasons to be here,” Christie said. “My plan to stay out of trouble … is to tell people about the Lord.”

The interfaith candlelight vigil offered prayers and readings from Zen centers, synagogues and churches. San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders proclaimed Sunday as “Homeless Persons Remembrance Day” and the county Board of Supervisors offered a similar proclamation.

Organizers then read the names of the dead. Marcos Rodriguez, a homeless man who declined to give his age, said the ceremony came on the same weekend that an acquaintance had passed away. The man, who was missing an arm and a leg, will be among the first names added to next year’s list. Rodriguez said. “You might not know his name, but he’s in our blessings tonight.”

Since 2001, 668 homeless people have died on the streets, according to the county Medical Examiner’s Office.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2010/nov/08/san-diego-march-remembers-homeless-who-have-died-s/

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SPEAK OUT AGAINST STATE BUDGET CUTS
AFFECTING THE DISABLED, SENIORS & OTHERS

Friday, June 4th
5:00-6:30pm
Eureka Courthouse

A rally and march to speak out regarding Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s proposed state budget cuts to programs/services, will be held from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Friday, June 4 in front of the Humboldt County Courthouse in Eureka.

Organized by Tri-County Independent Living (TCIL), the focus of the event will be on cuts to Medi-Cal, In-Home Support Services (IHSS), mental health services, Medi-Cal, SSI recipients, Calworks, and Regional Centers as well as education and other programs that directly affect people with disabilities, seniors, children and infants, students, and other California residents. Another focus will be on legitimacy of the Governor’s anti-fraud measures aimed at IHSS care providers and recipients.

“People with disabilities, including seniors, veterans, students and others, have already been affected by extensive budget cuts that were passed last year, points out Chris Jones, Executive Director for TCIL. “Now the Governor is targeting these citizens once again, which will put a further strain on local resources and cost us all more in tax dollars, reduced safety, independence and quality of life for thousands, and in lost lives.”

“The Governor and certain legislators continue to ignore the ramifications of these cuts and refuse to even consider alternative revenue options for helping to balance the budget,” says Cindy Calderon, Systems Change Advocate at TCIL. “They also continue to demonize IHSS providers and recipients through anti-fraud measures that were enacted without input by program participants, were based on unsubstantiated claims by the Governor of “massive fraud” in the IHSS program, and which impose an unwieldy process on IHSS care providers, while greatly compromising the privacy of often vulnerable IHSS recipients.”

This rally is also being held in June to help mark the 11th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Olmstead Decision, which affirmed the rights of people with disabilities, seniors and others to live in their own homes instead of institutions.

“Once again the Governor has shown a complete disregard for the spirit of the Olmstead Decision,” adds Calderon. “Further state cuts are a clear indication of the lack of commitment by the State of California to this Supreme Court ruling because they greatly reduce the ability of people with disabilities, seniors and others to live independently at home. This makes no sense, because the cost of keeping a person in their own home using an IHSS care provider is far less than having that person in an institutionalized setting. Cuts to the IHSS program, Medi-Cal, SSI recipients, mental health services and other programs will continue to force many people out of their own homes, into the streets, into hospital emergency rooms, and into nursing homes where there may not even be enough beds to accommodate them,” Calderon further pointed out. “In fact, if the Governor has his way with cutting about half of the IHSS program, then tens of thousands of more Californians will end up losing jobs! ”

The June 4 rally and march will include short speeches from several area social service program recipients as well as care providers, and representatives from the local offices of Assemblyman Wes Chesbro and Senator Pat Wiggins. Chesbro has been invited to speak and may be able to attend if he’s not required to be in Sacramento on that day. There will also be an opportunity to sign letters to local elected officials, including a thanks to District Assembly Member Wes Chesbro, for his ongoing support for the IHSS program, and petitions regarding the budget cuts.

The local chapter of the renowned “Raging Grannies,” as well as a contingent of the marching, performing brass band known as “Bandemonium,” will be on-hand to provide some entertainment. Attendees are encouraged to bring signs and be ready to chant, and to march about two blocks.

For further information about the march/rally, contact Cindy Calderon or Glenn Reed at Tri-County Independent Living, (707) 445-8404 or TTY: (707) 445-8405.

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Today, April 4th, 2010, Easter Sunday and the anniversary of Martin Luther King’s assassination, poor people and their allies unite with the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign (PPEHRC) in the March To Fulfill The Dream -advancing Dr. King’s dream of ending poverty.

The March to Fulfill the Dream will visit dozens of cities between New Orleans and Detroit, the site of the US Social Forum 2010, to highlight the urgent need for affordable housing and healthcare in the United States. Housing, healthcare, and jobs are human rights according to the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, endorsed by the U.S. in 1948. Continuing the legacy of Dr. King’s 1968 Poor People’s Campaign, which was cut short by his assassination, the tour is part of a larger strategy to unite poor people’s groups and their allies from across the country to build a diverse nonviolent movement to end poverty.

The PPEHRC caravan will visit many cities, including historic cities from the Civil Rights movement, for which Dr. King became the famous spokesperson. Each stop will include marches, demonstrations, and speak-outs led by poor people from the local cities, dramatizing the plight of today’s swelling numbers of the poor. Among the stops is Marks, Mississippi, where Dr. King launched the original Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 with a march and caravan to the nation’s capital.

“We don’t expect the changes we need to come from Washington or Wall Street, so we are building a mass movement to fight for the healthcare, housing, and jobs we need,” stated Khalilah Collins of Women in Transition, a PPEHRC member group in Louisville, Kentucky. “We are developing leaders from the ranks of the poor to create solutions ourselves and build a sustainable system.”

The Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign is a national coalition of over 125 grassroots anti-poverty groups, most of which are led directly by poor and homeless people. It is the nation’s largest anti-poverty organization that is led directly by the poor.

The March to Fulfill the Dream and the U.S. Social Forum (USSF) will connect poor people and anti-poverty groups from across the country with a special focus on education and leadership development.

The caravan, and the USSF itself, where more than 20,000 people representing progressive groups from across the U.S. and the world will gather, will provide spaces for poor people and their allies to further develop the analysis and strategy to build the movement and challenge the structures that cause poverty.

All major social movements in history have been led by those most affected by problems. The Civil Rights, American Revolution, and Women’s Suffrage movements were all led by those most oppressed by injustice. The crisis in our economic system gets fixed when poor people are organized to lead the fight,” said Cheri Honkala, National Organizer of PPEHRC.

We march, united, to bridge the gap across race lines, across gender lines, and across class lines, to “Fulfill the Dream”.

Join the march through major cities; the map route can be found here and on the website of PPEHRC (http://old.economichumanrights.org/USSF2010/route.shtml)

 

* New Orleans – April 4, 5,6,7
* Waveland – April 8,9,10
* Mobile – April 11, 12, 13
* Selma – April 14, 15 ,16
* Montgomery – April 17, 18, 19
* Birmingham – April 20, 21, 22
* French Camp – April 23, 24, 25
* Glendora – April 26 27, 28
* Marks – April 29, 30 and May 1st
* Memphis – May 2, 3 ,4
* Chattanooga – May 5, 6, 7
* Nashville – May 8,9,10
* Knoxville – May 11, 12, 13
* Louisville – May 14 15 16
* Lexington – May 17, 18, 19
* Cincinnati – May 20 21 22
* Dayton – May 23, 24, 25
* Columbus – May 26, 27 , 28
* Mansfield – May 29
* Akron – May 30, 31
* Youngstown/Warren – June 2-4
* Cleveland – June 5-8
* Lorain/Sandusky – June 9-11
* Toledo – June 12-14
* Benton Harbour – June 15-17
* Flint – June 18-20
* Detroit – June 21 and on to forum

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