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Posts Tagged ‘PARC’

Homeless Persons Memorial Day

Please join us, on the shortest day/longest night of the year, to remember and honor people who have died while homeless in Humboldt County. 
 

2pm- 10pm: Gazebo (2nd and F), Old Town, Eureka, CA 95501 
4pm: Under the clock, Garberville, CA 95542
 

We will gather from 2pm to 10pm with food, music, candles, and opportunity to share your thoughts and memories about the friends and neighbors we have lost. There will also be naloxone training and education. This will all be happening at the Gazebo (2nd and F) in Old Town Eureka on Thursday, December 21st – Winter Solstice and Homeless Persons’ Memorial Day.

In Southern Humboldt, you’re invited to gather “under the clock” in Garberville at 4pm, and there will be a candle light vigil in honor of those who have died while homeless, with no where to go.

FOOD AND DONATIONS FOR EUREKA GATHERING [certainly Garberville folks would like donations, too!]:

We are accepting donations of food and warm clothing to ensure our community members can make it through the night.

Please bring warm, clean donations of survival gear to the event: backpacks, sweaters, sleeping bags/blankets, hats, socks, belts, shoes, etc.

If you can, bring some vegetarian/vegan food (so everyone can enjoy). Regarding food, message or call Sarah Torres and let her know when you can bring your dish/food item. 707.267.4757.

Please show your support if you’re housed. Spread the word.

This year there has been a lot of violence against homeless people and unnecessary deaths of people without shelter. We honor those who have died by defending the dignity and safety of people living without shelter. And working so that no one is left out in a wet, cold. and dangerous situation.

Hope to see you Dec 21st. It is important that we come together and stay connected.

This year’s Homeless Persons’ Memorial Day is organized by people from Affordable Homeless Housing Alternatives (AHHA), Humboldt Area Center for Harm Reduction (HACHR), folks from Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community (PARC), and other caring people in the community.

Homeless Persons’ Memorial Day

HOMELESS PEOPLE DIE FROM SYSTEMIC VIOLENCE

(more…)

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January 14, 2013
This morning, a man staying at the Eureka Rescue Mission (an evangelical Christian shelter unavailable to many] was told by a staff member the following: a young man who the shelter turned away the night before because he didn’t pass the required BREATHALYZER to eat or sleep at the Mission, died in the cold. Froze to death. IT’S TIME, FOLKS. TIME TO RISK YOUR COMFORT ZONE AND SAVE LIVES. WE ARE READY TO ASSIST AS EXPLAINED BELOW. More blankets and sleeping bags need as well. ~Verbena (707)442-7465

EMERGENCY- Freezing weather and people with no shelter.

Cold weather, especially over an extended period of time, takes a heavy toll on the health and well-being of the most vulnerable members in our community.

A few years ago, a small household in Eureka, made its garage available as a safe sleeping space for people with no shelter. The household and a group of friends (many PEOPLE PROJECT folks) organized the space in response to the dangerous weather and police conditions on the street. It was actually quite simple. Prior to opening the safe sleeping space, we discussed how we thought it would work best. One of the things decided beforehand was that we would make the space available for 11 nights (December 21-31), and would be explicit about that time frame, so that people sleeping there could depend on a stable schedule.

At this time, opening your home or some covered space is imperative. We were so grateful for the garage, and all went well. Being only a temporary situation, we are reaching out to you, asking you to open your garage, yard, or big room for whatever time you decide is possible.
We imagine a rotating emergency sleeping space.

We have found that when a community cooperates and shares in the protection of its most vulnerable members, the result is a vital sense of security experienced by all.

The people who shared their garage and those of us who supported and helped coordinate that emergency shelter space are available to talk with you about our experiences. We are eager to assist you in many ways if you are able to open up a sleeping space.

Ways we can assist you include: collecting floor padding, blankets, sleepware, and other necessary warm things (the garage just used had a cement floor); driving folks who need a ride to and from the space; and being present in the sleeping space overnight. The volunteer-run PARC (Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community) in downtown Eureka fully supports the creation of temporary or permanent dignified community sleeping spaces. PARC is available, for any set-up you may provide, as a phone contact, a donation drop-off, and a dedicated resource for people offering or utilizing a safe shelter.

Please Call PARC: (707) 442-7465

People can and do freeze to death in cold or wet or windy weather.. here we have all three at once. And the police continue to harass people and ruin their gear in the rain and cold. Please call and/or email if you want to talk about opening a space up yourself. It is freezing at night, and we can make a way through these hard times together.

Please Call PARC: (707) 442-7465

The following are the guidelines that were posted on the inside of the garage. You may have some different ideas for your place. We believe that emphasizing honor, dignity, and relationship makes for a truly “safe space.”

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ WELCOME ///////////////////////////

This is a hate-free space. that means…
NO racism, sexism, homophobia, etc
* please no physical or verbal violence
* smaller room is for women only
* bigger room is for all

To protect this safe sleeping space…
– no drinking alcohol or doing drugs (including pot) here
– use lights, not candles
– every night, come through front house door when you first arrive;
then use the front gate to go in/out.
– use bathroom in the house (walk in back door, then to right)
– quiet after 9pm, and during cigarette breaks

You are welcome to sleep here…
– every night through the night of Dec 31st.
– Please come in no earlier than 6pm and no later than 10:30pm
-mornings, out by 9am please

Please do not leave your belongings here,
as no-one is here to protect them

Please communicate theses guide-lines with newcomers

If you need anything, please feel free to ask.

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\///////////////////////////////////////////

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There has been no response.

From: Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community
Date: Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 3:05 PM
Subject: Message to Dan Ice, Exec Director of Eureka Rescue Mission: November 30, 2010
To: erm.director@sbcglobal.net

Greetings,

My name is Verbena Lea, and I am the Executive Director of PARC [Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community] in Eureka. After I phoned the Eureka Rescue Mission Executive Office on November 28, 2010, I received a return call from you the next day at the PARC office. I had back to back appointments and phone calls that day and apologize that I was unable to return your call. I appreciate your quick response; I was informed that you were going through some trying times, and hope you are well today.

I have many concerns about the Eureka Rescue Mission, and have for some time. Here I will share with you some of my concerns and also a request. please send to me, in hard copy and/or electronic versions, the Eureka Rescue Mission’s policies, rules, requirements, and by-laws.

Some of my concerns are related to what is purported to be Mission policy and what is actually enforced or imposed upon some or all of the people wishing to access the services. Much of my knowledge and understanding of the workings and requirements of the Mission are quite disturbing. I also have serious concerns related to the honesty and integrity of your employee, Bryan Hall – with respect to his treatment of program members and others seeking to access services at the Mission, in addition to his influence on Mission policies and attitudes, being that he is in a position of authority. Mr. Hall’s public defense of the fatal police beating of Martin Cotton in August of 2007 was not only incredulous but disconcerting. Furthermore, his indifference to the trauma experienced now and then by other people at the Mission who witnessed the beating puts into question where Mr. Hall’s loyalties truly lie and raises severe concerns as to his sense of humanity and his treatment and consideration of people who utilize Mission resources.

When examining the Eureka Rescue Mission website, I find a number of discrepancies or perhaps omissions in terms of what is stated on the website versus what really happens at the Mission and what is required of people seeking shelter and/or meals at the Mission.

I would like to point out a repeat occurrence that is just one part of a longer list of what I consider unethical and troubling practices of the Eureka Rescue Mission. There are announcements, from time to time, by Mission staff, forbidding certain activities outside of the Mission, for instance, sitting in certain areas of town. These announcements include explicit threats of exclusion from access to food and shelter at the Mission for anyone who engages in such activities. Given the non-threatening and non-violent nature of such ‘forbidden’ activities, such as sitting in certain areas of town, the Mission’s arbitrary rules seem unreasonable, intrusive and oppressive, and appear to emerge from the whims (and fears) of whoever is in charge at the time.

As stated above, I am hereby requesting written and/or electronic copies of the policies, by-laws, and any other written and unwritten rules, requirements, guidelines, tenets, etc. of the Eureka Rescue Mission. My purpose is to gain some clarity as to how the Mission is supposed to be functioning in our community, which I may find is different than how it currently functions. Most important, I think it is critical to have transparency from the Eureka Rescue Mission, not only for myself, but also for the organizations I work with, the people who frequent the Mission, people who may in the future seek to volunteer or receive assistance at the Mission, and the general public. I am aware that the Mission receives consistent monetary and other donations from the community. Integrity demands that the same community be provided the truth, so it may understand how the Mission conducts itself. The community deserves to know, not only how many beds, meals, and sermons occur, but also the systematic indignities that unfortunately are perpetuated by the Eureka Rescue Mission against people who need to utilize its resources. I imagine that your Board of Directors is unaware of some of the nefarious goings-on at the Mission by people in positions of authority and that the Board does not know of some of the unpublished “policies.” Thus, I intend to respectfully make the Board members aware.

Please understand that my request comes from a sincere care for the well-being, rights and dignity of all people. Perhaps my request will present your organization with an opportunity to examine how things are going, tidy up, solidify its position on various aspects of its operations, and tend to any situations or practices of the Mission that are at odds with the humanitarian and empowering example of Jesus Christ.

Thank you for your immediate attention to these matters. Please respond at your earliest convenience. Electronic documents can be sent to this email, and hard copies to the PARC address below.

Sincerely,
Verbena Lea
Executive Director
Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community [PARC]
1617 Third Street
Eureka, CA 95501
(707) 442-7465
parc.office@gmail.com

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Days of Action To Stop Police Brutality, Repression and the Criminalization of a Generation, October 22nd and 23rd!

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS TRAINING:
HOW TO HANDLE ENCOUNTERS WITH COPS

Saturday October 16th 1:30pm – 5:30pm

Do you know what to do if you’re stopped by the police? Do your children?
Are you tired of your rights being violated?
This workshop focuses on the law “on the street” — what your rights are and how cops try to trick you out of them. We want to share strategies to survive police encounters.

Hosted by Redwood Curtain CopWatch

The training will be in EUREKA at PARC [Peoples’ Action For Rights and Community]. 

PARC is in the Q St. Alley between 3rd and 2nd St., on the SW side of the Samoa bridge

                                                                           ALL AGES
                                                                           FREE
                                                                           SNACKS

Call (707) 633-4493 for more info.

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Please join Redwood Curtain CopWatch for a free double-feature film screening of “Safety Orange”, an insightful film which “looks deep into the culture of the American criminal [in]jusice system,”  and “Operation Small Axe,” a recent documentary centered around the police assasination of Oscar Grant in Oakland, and the people’s movement against police terrorism that has strengthened since then.


WHERE? at Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community [PARC] in Eureka

WHEN? Saturday, October 9th, 7pm


Snacks and good discussion also!

PARC is located in the Q Street Alley between 3rd and 2nd Street, toward the Samoa bridge.

Please call the CopWatch number for directions and any other information:  (707) 633-4493


SAFETY ORANGE

        “By now we have all heard the staggering statistics on the American justice system: 25% of the world’s prisoners, over 2 million incarcerated, 6 million under some type of legal supervision, and hundreds of thousands locked up in facilities which are run by private companies. Beginning with the deaths following the Attica uprising thirty years ago, Safety Orange explores the radical changes in public policy that have wrought poor neighborhoods as war zones and public schools as decrepit gulags with random searches and few windows.

         The film revolves around how the architecture of the prison and that of the school have collapsed into one another as the architects themselves have moved from building hospitals and schools in the 70s and early 80s to building prisons in the last fifteen years, as public funds for the former dried up. This policy process is explained through graphic elements and interviews and is understood by the term “from welfare to warfare”. The film accompanies a Fresno anti gang police task force whose job is to register youths as gang members and ends on a bus from NYC to Attica with women going to visit loved ones incarcerated there. Safety Orange is a documentary which looks deep into the culture of the American criminal justice system.”

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KNOW YOUR RIGHTS TRAINING:
HOW TO HANDLE ENCOUNTERS WITH COPS

Saturday Sept. 25th 1:30pm – 5:30pm

 

hosted by Redwood Curtain CopWatch

at PARC [Peoples’ Action For Rights and Community]

EUREKA
Q St. Alley between 3rd and 2nd St.

ALL AGES
FREE
SNACKS

 

Call (707) 633-4493 for more info.

http://redwoodcurtaincopwatch.net/node/552/

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The True Cost of Coal

 

Join us for a visual workshop & storytelling on COAL POWER, CLIMATE CHANGE, and SUSTAINABILITY. Gather ’round a giant collaborative mural mapping out the big picture of the fuel that feeds the American Dream- and what we’re really paying for it. What are REAL ALTERNATIVES for all of us?

Join the Beehive Design Collective with their newest graphic, “The True Cost of Coal.”

Sat, Sept 18th 7:00pm
@ P.A.R.C. (Peoples’ Action for Rights and Community)
Eureka: Q St. Alley between 2nd and 3rd St.
Food and Presentation
FREE!!
———————–

Beehive Collective swarming Eureka!!

Dear friends at the People Project and PARC,

I’m writing on behalf of the Beehive collective, an all-volunteer collective of artists, activists, and educators. We create large scale graphics campaigns to raise awareness and mobilize communities around social justice issues. Right now, a group of Bees is on a bicycle tour down the West coast with our new graphic, The True Cost of Coal. We use a giant, portable fabric mural to tell the story of climate change and mountaintop removal coal mining and how they’re connected with larger systems of oppression.

One big piece of the project and the mural is about what it means to be able to call a place home, and the dynamics that create displacement and houselessness historically and today. It sounds like you all are doing some really inspiring work around community solidarity and power, and we’d love to put together a community presentation about the work we’re doing and how it all connects.

You can find more information about our work at http://www.beehivecollective.org/english/coal.htm.

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